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Sergeant Dennis Ryan of the Royal Canadian Mounted Police representing the Gustafsen Lake Crisis Management Team in September 1995 stated: "Kill this Clark, smear the prick and everyone with him."

Why? “The very foundations that Canadian society is built upon are threatened here,” is the answer the RCMP spokesperson gave in an interview at the time. The history of those "very foundations," and the true nature of what "is threatened here," is the subject of Ongoing Genocide.

Clark was described by one of his clients, the Secwepemc traditionalist elder Wolverine, as “the most dangerous lawyer in Canada.” This opinion was shared by the RCMP, the provincial and federal governments, the bench, bar and Chief Justice of Canada and even the National Chief of the Assembly of First Nations.

A concerted and comprehensive “smear and disinformation campaign” across the national media was revealed, at trial, to have been conducted against Clark, Wolverine and the other traditionalists and Sundancers involved in the month long 1995 armed standoff at Gustafsen Lake.

Clark was officially demonized, disbarred and destroyed because of what he knows and what he can prove. And what he can prove is that Constitutional fraud and usurpation-as-genocide continues to be the modus operandi of the Canadian judiciary.

He spent forty-six years defending the rights of Natives across North America. A scholar specializing in the legal history of the evolving relationship between Natives and Newcomers, he holds an MA in constitutional history and a PhD in comparative jurisprudence and is the author of Native Liberty, Crown Sovereignty and Justice in Paradise (McGill-Queen’s University Press).

The ten essays in Ongoing Genocide caused by Judicial Suppression of the "Existing" Aboriginal Rights deal with aspects of the "genocide"—within the meaning of section 2(b) of the United Nations' genocide convention—of Indigenous peoples in Canada. That section indicts the imposition of "serious bodily or mental harm" against groups, such as that evidenced by the high rates of suicides of Indians in reaction to the courts' injustices, committed for political reasons contrary to the rule of law.

Much of Clark's awareness of the "serious bodily or mental harm" meted out by the court system's injustices comes from the fact he lived for twelve years on Indian reservations in northern Canada. He and his wife Margaret raised their three children there and were witnesses to the loss of lives attributable to the stress to which the young people in particular were vulnerable.

The appendix—entitled "Judicial Culpability for War and Genocide in the Age of American Empire"—deals with the failure of the North American Judiciary to enforce the constitutional provisions prohibiting international war except in self defense to an attack. The lessons learned and practiced on the Natives of North America are exported to the global village, a surrogate Indian country, and the judges do nothing to prevent this pursuant to the rule of law, which it is their constitutional duty to uphold.

The cause of the genocidal suppression of existing constitutional law is the criminal politicization of the judiciary. Pointing this out to the courts led to the conviction of the author for criminal contempt of court and disbarment for "conduct unbecoming" a barrister and solicitor.

Since then the judicial ignoring of existing constitutional law, for political reasons, has become further entrenched.

 

 

About the Author

BRUCE CLARK spent forty-six years defending the rights of Natives across North America. A scholar specializing in the legal history of the evolving relationship between Natives and Newcomers, he holds an MA in constitutional history and a PhD in comparative jurisprudence and is the author of Native Liberty, Crown Sovereignty and Justice in Paradise (McGill-Queen’s University Press).

The ten essays in Ongoing Genocide caused by Judicial Suppression of the "Existing" Aboriginal Rights deal with aspects of the "genocide"—within the meaning of section 2(b) of the United Nations' genocide convention—of Indigenous peoples in Canada. That section indicts the imposition of "serious bodily or mental harm" against groups, such as that evidenced by the high rates of suicides of Indians in reaction to the Newcomers' courts' injustices, committed for political reasons contrary to the rule of law.

The appendix—entitled "Judicial Culpability for War and Genocide in the Age of American Empire"—deals with the failure of the North American Judiciary to enforce the constitutional provisions prohibiting international war except in self defense to an attack. The lessons learned and practiced on the Natives of North America are exported to the global village, a surrogate Indian country, and the judges do nothing to prevent this pursuant to the rule of law, which it is their constitutional duty to uphold.

The cause of the genocidal suppression of existing constitutional law is the criminal politicization of the judiciary. Pointing this out to the courts led to the conviction of the author for criminal contempt of court and disbarment for "conduct unbecoming" a barrister and solicitor, in consequence of which the judicial ignoring of existing constitutional law, for political reasons, has become further entrenched.

Much of Clark's awareness of the "serious bodily or mental harm" meted out by the court system's injustices comes from the fact he lived for twelve years on Indian reservations in northern Canada. He and his wife Margaret raised their three children there and were witnesses to the loss of lives attributable to the stress to which the young people in particular were vulnerable.

Advance Reviews:

“Bruce Clark’s essential collection of essays captures the issue right at the start with the title. The fact of the judicial suppression of justice as the application of truth to affairs may shock those who do not understand the connection between the denial of Indigenous peoples’ rights by the Canadian judiciary and the consequences of that denial, which amount to a genocide of those peoples. But the shock can only turn into shame as the reader follows his examination of the historical legal and constitutional record that proves his argument and the documents that bear witness to the inability of the dominating legal system to provide any justice to indigenous peoples, since it is the legal system that seeks to erase indigenous national sovereignty.
            “This collection of essays is necessary for anyone who is interested in learning how the legal system, which is supposed to provide order and justice to the people is, in fact, in the case of the indigenous nations, used to destroy peoples and their cultures, to create disorder and injustice. Although it relies on legal arguments and references to case law the average lay person who is interested in the subject will be able to follow the arguments and come to their own conclusions.  Every student of law and politics, of indigenous rights and history should have a copy of this book; in fact so should any citizen interested in Canada and its true character as an imperial power.”   

                 - Christopher Black, international criminal lawyer

“Bruce Clark was described by one of his clients, the Secwepemc traditionalist elder Wolverine, as ‘the most dangerous lawyer in Canada.’ This opinion was shared by the RCMP, the provincial and federal governments, the bench, bar and Chief Justice of Canada and even the National Chief of the Assembly of First Nations. A concerted and comprehensive 'smear and disinformation campaign' across the national media was revealed, at trial, to have been conducted against Clark, Wolverine and the other traditionalists and Sundancers involved in the month long 1995 armed standoff at Gustafsen Lake. Why? 'The very foundations that Canadian society is built upon are threatened here,' is the answer the RCMP spokesperson gave in an interview at the time.
          “The history of those 'very foundations,' and the true nature of what 'is threatened here,' is the subject of this new and powerful collection of essays, published over a ten year period in Dissident Voice and Global Jurist (Frontiers), by a true Canadian dissident. Bruce Clark was officially demonized, disbarred and destroyed because of what he knows, and what he can prove. And what he can prove is that Constitutional fraud and usurpation-as-genocide continues to be the modus operandi of the Canadian settler-state. For anyone who cares about Canada and its persistent pernicious colonialism, Aboriginal Rights and Genocide: The judicial suppression of justice as the application of truth to affairs is an eye-opening must-read.”

 - John Shafer, Settlers in Support of Indigenous Sovereignty (SISIS)

“Clark believes in the notion of applying law to achieve justice. Justice is a concept that is higher than the self, thus Clark took on the establishment to seek justice for his Indigenous clients. In the end he was punished for his zeal for justice. In Aboriginal Rights and Genocide: The judicial suppression of justice as the application of truth to affairs Clark presents the legal case for Indigenous sovereignty such that the layperson can readily grasp the arguments. While constitutional and international law should be preeminent, in Canada writes Clark, ‘The modus operandi of the legal establishment and its collaborating Indian accomplices is the suppression of the constitutional and international law that the establishment intentionally is breaking.’
           “Pressing to have his legal arguments heard and a decision rendered in court ultimately cost Clark his career as a lawyer. But this was not the end of Clark or the quest for justice. Aboriginal Rights and Genocide puts forward the case that the Canadian law courts do not dare to deliberate. That should not preclude people of conscience becoming informed. Is Canada a just society? Read the book and decide for yourself. Humanity requires many more brave warriors like Bruce Clark.”

 – Kim Petersen, former editor of the Dissident Voice newsletter and former editor of the Original Peoples section of the grassroots Dominion newspaper

“Bruce Clark's rigorous analysis of the genocidal unconstitutionality of Canada's treatment of the native peoples and appropriation of their land is a great service in the pursuit of truth and justice. The essays in this book document the abandonment by the legal establishment (judges and lawyers) of the principle of the rule of law, in the service of Empire. This provides needed insight about the current state of Canadian institutional integrity to all who seek a society that actually adheres to democratic and humanistic principles.”

 - Joseph Hickey, M.Sc., Ph.D. candidate, Executive Director of the Ontario Civil Liberties Association (OCLA)